Educator and Researcher Resources

After your visit


Continue your exploration of the topics covered in your field trip program with one or more of the following exercises.

Live • Work • Play

Connecting with the Past

Our story will introduce you to some of the many different types of jobs people had at Britannia. Use this exercise to have your students imagine working at Britannia and writing a letter home to their parents describing life and work in this isolated resource town.
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Click here for student worksheet.


What’s in a Photo?

Engage your students in discovering how historic photos help us interpret the past.
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Re-explore our Story

During your visit your class will engage in the telling of Britannia’s story. Use our word search puzzles to take a second look at our rich history.

Puzzle one asks your students to find the characters in the puzzle from a list of names.
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Puzzle two asks your students to read a more detailed version of the story told on your visit and find the capitalized words in the puzzle.
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In their Own Words – Social Structure

Use this exercise to examine how the stories of people from the past can fail to capture the entire story.
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In their Own Words – Minorities at Britannia

Examine the racial segregation experienced at Britannia and how the attitudes of the time compare to today.
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In their Own Words – Women at Britannia

Over the course of Britannia’s life, the accepted roles of women in society changed. Compare and contrast the lives of women at Britannia to the lives of women in Canada today.
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In their Own Words – Women Underground

Today, women are accepted in every role in mining. This was not always the case. Examine this change through Britannia’s first request to allow a woman to work underground.
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MINING: THEN AND NOW

Environmental Journeys – Britannia 1918 to New Prosperity 2014

Mining changed dramatically over the course of the 20th century. So did our understanding of its impact on the environment. Extend your look at how environmental standards changed with this exercise which asks students to examine changes in attitudes towards the environment.
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Video – ‘This is my story – Marie Bourgoin’

This two minute video produced by Rio Tinto gives a glimpse into the mine of the future where everything is remotely operated. It also provides one look at women in mining today.
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In Their Own Words - Women in Mining

Mining – it is a man’s domain, or so it once was. Today however, women are an important part of the mineral exploration and extraction industry. Use this exercise to examine how attitudes have changed with regards to women in mining.
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In Their Own Words - Safety at Britannia - Silicosis

Over the life of the Britannia Mine, the understanding and prevention of silicosis advanced tremendously. Use this exercise to examine this serious issue and how things improved from the perspective of the government and workers.
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MINING: THEN AND NOW - THE BIGGER PICTURE

Mining: Tomorrow and Beyond – Discussing the Bigger Picture

During your visit, your class discovered how mining changed in North America over the 1900s as well as how mining companies today face a wide range of difficult decisions on how, where, and when they will mine. Continue the discussion back in the classroom with “Mining: Tomorrow and Beyond”.
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Mining in the Developing World

The developing world is the new frontier for mining. Mineral exploration is venturing farther and deeper than ever before. As it does, the same issues we faced with industrialized mining are now facing the developing world. What are the laws; how are they enforced; how, when, and where should we mine? With large scale mining, these issues can be tackled by civil society, government, and the industry. Not so easily addressed is the impact of illegal mining on the environment and human health.

Explore with your students some of the issues and outcomes of our endless quest for mined resources.While mining is essential to our way of life, it is not without issues. This activity presents several short videos that look both at some of the impacts and some of the benefits of mining in these countries.
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In Their Own Words - The Safety Record

Britannia is known for having an excellent safety record. This is in large part because of the Company’s efforts to improve safety over the years. This exercise asks your students to look at safety from the perspectives of the Company, government, and workers and propose how they would make mining safer.
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In Their Own Words - Safety at Britannia

Accidents and long-term workplace hazards are both a part of Britannia’s history. Have your students examine multiple accounts of two accidents and one workplace hazard to determine what we can be certain about.
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Environmental Journeys – Government Legislation

BC introduced its Pollution Control Act in 1967. When the Act went into effect, the Mine was now for the first time required to meet environmental standards. Since then, the standards have vastly improved. Have your class examine how they have changed with this exercise.
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Environmental Journeys – The Missing Years

In 1970, new legislation required the Britannia Mine to receive a permit to discharge its mine waste and water into Howe Sound. While the Mine closed in 1974, Anaconda (then owners of the Mine) worked with government to ensure the Mine’s effluent met the environmental standards of the day until they turned over the mine’s lands to a new company in 1979. What followed were two decades of environmental issues. In this paper, with recommended source documents for reference and an extended list of source documents, we tell the story of the years between closure and successful remediation of the mine site.

This story makes a good case study in how industry, government, and people contribute to the success or failure of a Mine’s environmental legacy.
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Recommended Source Documents

This RAR file contains the source documents necessary to support the key issues in ‘The Missing Years’.
Click here to download.


Full Set of Source Documents from the Museum’s Archives

This Zip file contains all the source documents used to recreate the ‘The Missing Years’ story.
Click here to download.

ENVIRONMENTAL LEGACIES

Video – How the EPCOR Water Treatment Plant has changed Britannia

The story of how the water treatment plant has changed the community of Britannia Beach. Length: 2:20




Environmental Journeys – The Missing Years

Acid Mine Drainage – the single largest environmental liability the mining industry faces today. During your visit, your class learned how Britannia is now a model for mine site remediation. How is it then that the Britannia Mine went from meeting the government’s standards to becoming a major AMD pollution source?

The problem began when new owners took over the closed mine site in 1979. What followed was two decades of environmental issues. In this paper, with recommended source documents for reference and an extended list of additional source documents, we tell the story of the years between closure and successful remediation of the mine site.

This story makes a good case study in how industry, government, and people contribute to the success or failure of a Mine’s environmental legacy.
Click here to view.


Recommended Source Documents

This RAR file contains the source documents necessary to support the key issues in ‘The Missing Years’.
Click here to download.


Full Set of Source Documents from the Museum’s Archives

This Zip file contains all the source documents used to recreate the ‘The Missing Years’ story.
Click here to download.